10 ways to unmask a provincial in Paris


Paris

A provincial in Paris, it is noticeable. Here are some clues to flush them out. Attention Article 100% clichés and bad faith!


  1. It is nice: marketers can identify the first time a provincial entering their shop; it is the only to say hello and please
  2. He smiled in the subway: the provincial holiday slice on these rushed and grumpy Parisians take a head three feet long .
  3. It has a k-way yellow emblem Disneyland Paris amusement park is a must for any provincial visiting Paris that respects. He proudly bear the famous poncho raincoat with the image of Mickey for the rest of his stay.
  4. He points any building thinking he is a famous monument before each Haussmann building, the provincial believed to have fallen the house of Victor Hugo. Must say that there are not so many examples of Haussmann architecture in its wheat of Mouans-Sartoux.
  5. It does not fall back on the right in the escalator: Provincial is not aware of the thousand and one uses implicit that govern the lives of the Paris metro. It remains motionless on the left of the escalator ... and shoving hurry Paris.
  6. It takes a level of 3 meters by 5, that unfolds in every corner, lacking éborgner distracted passersby: Provincial so afraid of getting lost in the big city he feels the need to consult his map every 33.5 seconds.
  7. He asks where the Eiffel Tower: no Paris never asks where the Eiffel Tower is located because that no Paris does get there .
  8. On the Champs Élysées, he stops every two meters to take photos: the provincial wants to capture his journey. Then he stops in the middle of the street and creates a traffic jam.
  9. In the subway at each station, he studied the map of the lines as if it were a nuclear formula: Provincial never seen anything as complex as the metro map. If we also add him RER and tram, it is permanently lost.
  10. It has a focus: When the provincial talks, it smells good cassoulet, sauerkraut, bouillabaisse, crepe cider ... In any case, his accent is so pronounced that Parisians do not understand. And do not respond to it.